On Locations & Setting in Modern Fallout Games

On Locations & Setting in Modern Fallout Games

If you’ve known me for longer than five minutes you’ll know how much I enjoyed (albeit critically) Fallout 3, absolutely LOVED Fallout: New Vegas, and how disappointed & bored I am in Fallout 4. I’m skipping over the broader concepts of why I feel the way I do, it would take forever to compile those years of tweets, and people like MrBtongue and HBomberGuy have explained it in more eloquently and intelligently than I ever attempted to.

Here I am focusing on one aspect of these three games which I feel have a profound impact on player experience and is a reflection of the game’s development: Locations and setting.

Locations in the context of this post refer to specific settlements, areas, etc in the game. These are self contained areas with a specific population of NPCs and often story attached to them. Setting will refer to the entire area the game is set in (D.C, Las Vegas, Boston, etc) as well as its aesthetic and aural components. We will start with the macro (setting) and move into the micro (locations) of each game. Continue reading “On Locations & Setting in Modern Fallout Games”

Nostalgia for What We Can’t Remember: Osamu Sato’s Video Games

Nostalgia for What We Can’t Remember: Osamu Sato’s Video Games

The phrase “only 90s kids remember” has become a joke to many who grew up during the 1990s, however there’s no denying people carry a certain admiration for that time when they were young. Media and popular culture produced during the decade has been described as containing prevalent aesthetic markers that, in retrospect, has become a visual and visceral guide for people to describe something as “90s.”

In addition to being a guide for identification, the aesthetic of the 90s appeals to many people who experienced it both in the context of the decade and today, through the reproduction of 90s aesthetic markers. This allure is why Nickelodeon is making a new Hey Arnold! movie or why Anastasia Beverly Hills made a “90s Makeup Vibes” makeup tutorial.

The popularity of these reproductions suggests that “remember” may not be the correct word to describe the continued interest in 90s things. 90s kids aren’t simply remembering, they’re drawn to what feels familiar and sentimental to them. For many, aesthetics associated with the 1990s are enough to fill them with nostalgia. Continue reading “Nostalgia for What We Can’t Remember: Osamu Sato’s Video Games”